Opt out of prism

Time goes by, people forget or ignore the fact that everything they do online is stored, analysed and read by foreign governments. Maybe because it's too inconvenient to prevent or maybe because they think "well, I have nothing to hide, what do I care if they read my e-mail?" Which is a valid point. Life is too short to worry about non-problems. But what about the people for whom it is a problem? The people who's very lives depend on it.

Journalists having their electronics confiscated due to illegally obtained digital eavesdropping? Their sources' anonymity compromised so that governments can silence them? Because, you know, silencing critics and whistleblowers is what we do in democracies these days. It isn't the illegal activities of the governments that is the problem, it's the fact that people talk about said activities. Apparently.

Before this post derails entirely into the realm of political vitriol let's get back on track. Switching from software that we know is compromised by governments really isn't hard but finding out about it can be quite tricky.

A while back I found a cleverly named site called Prism break which does just that. Inform you about software and services you can use with a much greater degree of security. Do these applications guarantee your integrity? No they don't, but they're a heck of a lot better than alternatives that directly feed your data to surveillance organizations.

Please consider the people who risk their lives and liberty to give the rest of us a degree of freedom we used to think was our right. It's not just about us regular Joes. What you do and the choices you make have consequences, whether or not you do it knowingly.

Prism break

blogroll

social